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Latest Blog Articles

Series Spotlight: Shakespeare &

Widely regarded as one of the greatest writers in the English language and the world’s greatest dramatist, William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright and actor. Shakespeare’s plays being translated in over 50 languages and performed across the globe for audiences of all ages. Shakespeare was also an actor and the creator of the Globe […]

Commemorating the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

Read an excerpt from Marek Haltof’s POLISH FILM AND THE HOLOCAUST: Politics and Memory. On April 19, 1943, the Warsaw ghetto uprising began after German troops and police entered the ghetto to deport its surviving inhabitants. Learn more about the history of this fierce act of resistance by reading the entry in the USHMM’s Holocaust […]

Book Preview: Making Scenes: Global Perspectives on Scenes in Rock Art

Did scenes in rock art create new ways of seeing the world? In the spirit of the SAA annual conference we are delighted to provide a book preview (along with striking images) of Iain Davidson and April Nowell’s title, MAKING SCENES: Global Perspectives on Scenes in Rock Art. MAKING SCENES: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON SCENES IN […]

Born on April 15: Durkheim, the ‘founding father’ of sociology

“Social man…is the masterpiece of existence.” ― Émile Durkheim (April 15, 1858 – November 15, 1917)

International Roma Day

International Roma Day (8 April) recognizes the history and celebrates the cultures, traditions, and contributions of Gypsy, Roma, and Traveler communities. In commemoration of this day, we are delighted to spotlight our growing Romani Studies series edited by anthropologist Sam Beck. This series aims to remove the stigma surrounding Roma scholarship, to engage with the controversies regarding Roma identity and, […]

Excerpt: Autism and Affordances of Achievement

Excerpted from Olga Solomon’s “Autism and Affordances of Achievement: Narrative Genres and Parenting Practices,” in The Social Life of Achievement THE SOCIAL LIFE OF ACHIEVEMENTEdited by Nicholas J. Long and Henrietta MooreVol. 2, Wyse Series in Social Anthropology What happens when people “achieve”? Why do reactions to “achievement” vary so profoundly? And how might an […]

Fascism and Conservation

Excerpted from Sandra Cheney’s Nature of the Miracle Years: Conservation in West Germany, 1945-1975 After 1945, those responsible for conservation in Germany resumed their work with a relatively high degree of continuity as far as laws and personnel were concerned. Yet conservationists soon found they had little choice but to modernize their views and practices […]

Most Popular #BerghahnOpenAnthro Articles of 2020

Berghahn Open Anthro is a subscribe-to-open model being piloted by Berghahn Books in partnership with Libraria, a group of researchers who are also supporting a number of other publishers hoping to adopt this model should the pilot prove successful. This model was developed in part through a 2019 ground-breaking collaborative meeting between publishers, libraries, funders, and OA experts. In the […]

Fascism and Film

Excerpted from Carl Plantinga’s “Fascist Affect in 300,” in Projections 13(2), 20-37. The stories we tell each other, or present via mass media, are important components of the cultural ecology of a place and time. This article argues that 300 (2007), directed by Zach Snyder and based on a comic book series both written and illustrated by […]

Blog: FocaalBlog

Giulia Dal Maso: The Landing of a Chinese Green Bond in Portugal

This post is part of a feature on “The Political Power of Energy Futures,” moderated and edited by Katja Müller (MLU Halle-Wittenberg), Charlotte Bruckermann (University of Bergen), and Kirsten W. Endres (MPI Halle). In a little restaurant in the midst of a foggy day, ... Continue reading →

Blog: Recollectus

CALL FOR PAPERS: (DE)COMMEMORATION

EDITED BOOK IN THE BERGHAHN BOOKS “Worlds of Memory” SERIES (DE)COMMEMORATION Making sense of the contemporary calls for tearing down statues and renaming places Editors Sarah Gensburger, French National Center […] ... Continue reading →

Blog: AJEC Blog

Marshall Sahlins, a legacy of connections

I would like to thank the AJEC blog for inviting me to remember my mentor and dissertation supervisor Marshall Sahlins, and particularly his connection to Europe. Famously, Sahlins spent two years in Paris in the late 1960s. He arrived just in time for May '68 — he told me ... Continue reading →

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